Tuscany

El Marsam Home & Studio


Umbertide, Umbria

Italy

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MENUS AND MEMORIES Ginda Simpson
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Restaurants in Tuscany Ristorante Patry

Ristorante Patry


Viale G. di Vittorio

53042 Chianciano Terme (SI)

0578-61281


Owner:  Gino Maresca


Hostaria del Ceccottino

Hostaria del Ceccottino


Piazza San Gregorio VII, 64

58017 Pitigliano (GR)

0564-614-069

Owners: Alessandro & Chiarra Francardi


Ristorante La Bucaccia

Ristorante La Bucaccia


Via Ghibellina, 17

Cortona

0575-606-039

Owner: Romano Magi

Chef: Agostina Magi


Buca di San Francesco

Buca di San Francesco


Via S. Francesco, 1

52100 Arezzo

0575-23271


Owner: Mario De Felippis

L'Osteria in Aboca

L'Osteria in Aboca


Frazione Aboca, 11

Sansepolcro (AR)

0575-749-125


Owner/Chef: Massimiliano Giovagnini

La Frateria di Padre Eligio

La Frateria di Padre Eligio


Convento di San Francesco

Cetona (SI)

0578-238-261

Hostaria La Tufa

Hostaria La Tufa


Ossaia di Cortona 67

Cortona (AR)

0575-677-717


Owner: Emanuela Rachini

Osteria Le Logge

Osteria Le Logge


Via del Porrione, 33

53100 Siena

0577-48013


La Taverna di San Giuseppe

La Taverna di San Giuseppe


Via Giovanni Dupré, 132

53100 Siena

0577-42286

Ristorante Tonino

Ristorante Tonino


Piazza Garibaldi, 1

Cortona

0575-630-500


Owner: Antonio Accordi

Osteria del Teatro

Osteria del Teatro


Via Maffei 2

Cortona

0575-630-556


Owner/Chef: Emiliano Rossi

Ristorante Il Pulcino

Ristorante Il Pulcino


Strada Statale 146

53045 Montepulciano (SI)

0578-758-711


Owners - Gabriella Matassini & Sergio Ercolani

Ristorante San Martino 26

Ristorante San Martino 26


Via S. Martino 26

53037 San Gimignano (SI)

0577-940-483


Owner: Fabio Pernarella

Chef: Ardit Curr

The cuisine of Tuscany is based on four fundamental ingredients – bread, extra-virgin olive oil, beef and wild game such as boar, deer, and rabbit, and wine. Like its Umbrian neighbors, Tuscan bread is salt-less, or sciappo. A local might tell you this is because the rest of the food is so flavorful that there is no need for salt in the bread. And they wouldn't be exaggerating. Besides the meat, legumes like beans, peas, and chickpeas, vegetables like tomatoes, cabbage, spinach, and artichokes are the foundation of the region's dishes.

As in many areas of Italy, la cucina toscana is peasant fare, most dishes purely seasonal and enjoyed when the ingredients are in season, making them anticipated and savored with appreciation.  And because so much of what appears on a Tuscan table is produced by food artisans in traditional ways, the quality of the food surpasses its industrial counterpart.  Crostini topped with chicken livers, olive paste, or other vegetables are popluar antipasti as is the more familiar bruschetta brushed with golden oil, fresh garlic and sun-ripened tomatoes.  For a first course, or primo, hearty soups reign over pasta, such as ribollita and pappa al pomodoro; both of these are thickened with crusty, day-old bread.  Nothing goes to waste!

The second course usually features beef, or wild game, but fish, a light egg frittata, a platter of local cheeses or an array of roasted vegetables are there to satisfy every taste and every appetite.   End your meal with Vin Santo (Holy Wine), a sweet dessert wine into which you dip your cantucci or biscotti – an experience that makes dining seem almost sacred.